What changes on 1 July 2021?

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What changes on 1 July 2021?


Super guarantee rate increase to 10%
On 1 July 2021, the Superannuation Guarantee (SG) rate will rise from 9.5% to 10% - the first rise since 2014. It will then steadily increase each year until it reaches 12% on 1 July 2025.

Annual Super Guarantee Rate Changes


SG Rate
1 July 2020 - 30 June 2021 9.5%
1 July 2021 - 30 June 2022 10%
1 July 2022 - 30 June 2023 10.5%
1 July 2023 - 30 June 2024 11%
1 July 2024 - 30 June 2025 11.5%
1 July 2025 - 30 June 2026 12%


Summary

Super guarantee rate increase to 10%


Indexation increases contribution caps and the transfer balance cap

Concessional and non-concessional contribution caps

Transfer balance cap – why you will have a personal cap

Minimum superannuation drawdown rates

Single touch payroll reporting


New stapled superannuation employer obligations for new staff

Currently, when an employer hires a new staff member, the employee is provided with a Choice of Fund form to identify where they want their superannuation to be directed. If the employee does not identify a fund, the employer directs their superannuation into a default fund.

When someone has multiple funds, it often erodes their balance through unnecessary fees and often insurance. And, as at 30 June 2020, there was $13.8 billion of lost and unclaimed superannuation in accounts across Australia.


Indexation increases contribution caps and the transfer balance cap

Indexation ensures that the caps on superannuation that limit how much you can transfer into super and how much you hold in a tax-free retirement account, remain relevant by making pre-determined increases in line with inflation. To trigger indexation, the consumer price index (CPI) needed to reach 116.9. Australia reached 117.2 in December 2020 triggering increases to the contribution and transfer balance caps from 1 July 2021. The next increase will occur when a December quarter CPI reaches 123.75.  

Concessional and non-concessional contribution caps

From 1 July 2021, the superannuation contribution caps will increase enabling you to contribute more to your superannuation fund (assuming you have not already reached your transfer balance cap).
The concessional contribution cap will increase from $25,000 to $27,500. Concessional contributions are contributions made into your super fund before tax such as superannuation guarantee or salary packaging.


Transfer balance cap – why you will have a personal cap

The transfer balance cap (TBC), as the name suggests, limits how much money you can transfer into a tax-free retirement account. From 1 July 2021, the general TBC will increase from $1.6m to $1.7m but not everyone will benefit from the increase.
From 1 July 2021, there will not be a single cap that applies to everyone. Instead, every individual will have their own personal TBC of between $1.6 and $1.7 million, depending on their circumstances.


Minimum superannuation drawdown rates

The Government has announced an extension of the temporary reduction in superannuation minimum drawdown rates for a further year until 30 June 2022.

Age Default minimum drawdown rates 2019-20, 2020-21 & 2021-22 reduced rates
Under 65 4% 2%
65 - 74 5% 2.5%
75 - 79 6% 3%
80 - 84 7% 3.5%
85 - 89 9% 4.5%
90 - 94 11% 5.5%
95 or more 14% 7%


Single touch payroll reporting

Single touch payroll will apply to most businesses from 1 July 2021, this will include small businesses (those with 19 or fewer staff) and businesses with closely held employees (e.g., directors of family companies, salary and wages for family employees of businesses). No further extensions will be granted.

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